Home / Accueil

Fort Frontenac National Historic Site of Canada

1 Ontario Street, Kingston, Ontario, K7K, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1923/05/25

General view of Fort Frontenac, showing sections of the north curtain wall and the west curtain wall in a traffic circle at the intersection of Ontario Street and Place D’Armes, 1995.; Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, J. Butterill, 1995.
General view
No Image
No Image

Other Name(s)

Fort Frontenac National Historic Site of Canada
Fort Frontenac
Fort Frontenac
Fort Cataraqui
Fort Cataraqui

Links and documents

Construction Date(s)

1673/01/01

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2009/04/29

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

Fort Frontenac National Historic Site of Canada is an archaeological site located beneath the intersection of Ontario Street and Place D’Armes in Kingston, Ontario. The site extends under four stone buildings, constructed during the 1820s as part of the former Tête du Pont Barracks on the southern portion of ground previously occupied by the original French fort. While these four buildings are part of a complex currently referred to as Fort Frontenac, only a fragment of the original fort can be seen today. Sections of the west and north limestone curtain walls are exposed on a traffic island at the intersection of Ontario Street and Place D’Armes. Official recognition refers to the footprint of Fort Frontenac.

Heritage Value

Fort Frontenac was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1923 because:
- built in 1673 by the Comte de Frontenac and rebuilt in 1675 and 1695, it was, for many years, the key to the West, the base of LaSalle’s explorations and a French outpost against the Iroquois and English.

Fort Frontenac, located at the confluence of the Cataraqui River and Lake Ontario, was established in 1673 by the Governor of New France, the Comte de Frontenac, in order to control access to the fur laden lands of the Great Lakes Basin and the Canadian Shield. As the fur trade expanded west along the Great Lakes and into the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys, the explorer René-Robert Cavelier de La Salle rebuilt the wooden fort into a stronger masonry building by reinforcing it with limestone walls and square bastions. The fort became a strong French outpost against the British and the Iroquois, as several smaller buildings were built around it and a community of settlers established themselves in the region. During one of La Salle’s extended explorations of the interior in 1682, the fort fell into the hands of creditors who neglected its defences and, after an attack by the Iroquois, the French ordered the fort’s destruction in 1689. However, in 1695, the Comte de Frontenac ordered the fort rebuilt, and it was occupied by a small garrison until 1745. In 1758, the British under Colonel John Bradstreet captured the fort and it remained in British possession until the end of the War of 1812, when it was deemed obsolete and was gradually demolished. Archaeological research in 1982 uncovered several sections of antiquated limestone walls constructed by La Salle, including those sections of the north and west curtain walls that remain visible today.

Sources: Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, Minutes, 1925; 2008.

Character-Defining Elements

The key elements that contribute to the heritage character of this site include:
- its location at the confluence of the Cataraqui River and Lake Ontario, which made it a geographically strategic French outpost for the fur trade and base for La Salle’s explorations;
- its footprint in relation to the former Tête du Pont Barracks and the surrounding city streets;
- the visibility of sections of the north curtain wall and the west curtain wall, in a traffic circle at the intersection of Ontario Street and Place D’Armes;
- the remains of the various phases of the fort, in their location, extent and materials, both discovered and undiscovered;
- all archaeological remains, both underground, undiscovered and discovered that relate to Fort Frontenac.

Recognition

Jurisdiction

Federal

Recognition Authority

Government of Canada

Recognition Statute

Historic Sites and Monuments Act

Recognition Type

National Historic Site of Canada

Recognition Date

1923/05/25

Historical Information

Significant Date(s)

1675/01/01 to 1675/01/01
1695/01/01 to 1695/01/01
1673/01/01 to 1832/01/01
1937/01/01 to 1937/01/01
1982/01/01 to 1982/01/01

Theme - Category and Type

Governing Canada
Military and Defence

Function - Category and Type

Current

Historic

Defence
Military Defence Installation
Leisure
Historic or Interpretive Site

Architect / Designer

René-Robert Cavelier de La Salle

Builder

n/a

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation

National Historic Sites Directorate, Documentation Centre, 5th Floor, Room 89, 25 Eddy Street, Gatineau, Quebec.

Cross-Reference to Collection

Fed/Prov/Terr Identifier

392

Status

Published

Related Places

Exterior photo

Vincent Block / Administration Office

Fort Frontenac is situated at the eastern entrance to Kingston where the Cataraqui River drains into Lake Ontario. Situated within the Canadian Forces complex at Fort Frontenac,…

Exterior photo

De Noyan Block

At the eastern entrance to the city, located at Fort Frontenac National Historic Site of Canada, the De Noyan Block is a simple rectangular two-storey, stone structure with a…

Side view

LaSalle Block

At the eastern entrance to the city, located in the Fort Frontenac National Historic Site of Canada, LaSalle Block is a long rectangular two-storey, stone structure with a low…

Exterior photo

Bradstreet Block

The Fort Frontenac National Historic Site, Bradstreet Block is located within the walled Tête de Pont barracks in Fort Frontenac which lies at the eastern edge of the City of…

Exterior photo

Courcelles Block

The Courcelles Block is located within the Tête de Pont barracks in Fort Frontenac which lies at the eastern edge of the city of Kingston. It is a three-storey, rectangular…

Exterior photo

Heating Plant, former Commissariat Storehouse

The Heating Plant is located within the walled Tete de Pont barracks in Fort Frontenac which lies at the eastern edge of the City of Kingston. The rectangular stone structure has…

General view

Ross Block

The Ross Block, also known as Building FF07, is located within the walled Tête de Pont barracks in Fort Frontenac which lies at the eastern edge of the City of Kingston. A…

SEARCH THE CANADIAN REGISTER

Advanced SearchAdvanced Search
Find Nearby PlacesFIND NEARBY PLACES PrintPRINT
Nearby Places