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ARMSTRONG BLOCK

10125 - 104 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, T5J, Canada

Formally Recognized: 2003/09/03

Armstrong Block Provincial Historic Resource (January 2000); Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch, 2000
West elevation
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Other Name(s)

n/a

Links and documents

Construction Date(s)

1912/01/01

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2004/10/27

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

The Armstrong Block consists of a four-storey mixed-use brick building in the Edwardian Commercial style, located in a mid-block location on one urban lot in the downtown neighbourhood that was the centre of Edmonton’s pre-World War One warehouse area. The designation applies to the exterior envelope of the building and the land.

Heritage Value

The 1912 Armstrong Block is significant as structural evidence of the rapid expansion of Edmonton prior to World War One and the early development of the warehouse district, an area of the downtown that accommodated the city’s industrial needs until 1913. By 1914, however, the Block housed an unusual combination of commercial and residential functions; the lower portions of the building were designed for the needs of wholesale businesses while the upper floors were subdivided into apartments and offices. By accommodating the growing demand for office and residential space, the Block reflected the changing urban landscape of the downtown core, and appears to be the only remaining building purpose-built for mixed uses in the downtown area.

The Armstrong Block is also significant because of its association with designer David Hardie (1882-1930), who designed a number of commercial and residential buildings in Edmonton. It is an excellent example of the Edwardian Commercial style in Alberta and an important element of the historic warehouse district of Edmonton, that contributes to the character of the historic streetscape.

Source: Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch (File: Des 2106)

Character-Defining Elements

The Edwardian-era architecture of the building is expressed in character-defining elements such as:
- form, scale and massing;
- steel frame for all floors;
- red pressed-brick facade construction with projecting brick pilasters that are rusticated at the ground floor level;
- cast stone detailing, including horizontal stone bands, sills and lintels;
- central double-door entrance with elaborate arched cast stone lintel composition;
- fenestration, including three rows of wood double-hung windows at the second, third and fourth floor levels on all four facades;
- two, large, main floor wood-framed, glazed storefronts with prism glass transoms;
- upper and lower full-width pressed-metal cornices and pressed-metal garland pilaster capitals [sheet metal detailing cartouches];
- flag pole
- elevated front parapet with arched pediment and cast stone “A” insignia;
- painted sign on the upper east wall;
- protective roof structure above the lower level entrances on the rear elevation.

Recognition

Jurisdiction

Alberta

Recognition Authority

Province of Alberta

Recognition Statute

Historical Resources Act

Recognition Type

Provincial Historic Resource

Recognition Date

2003/09/03

Historical Information

Significant Date(s)

n/a

Theme - Category and Type

Developing Economies
Trade and Commerce

Function - Category and Type

Current

Commerce / Commercial Services
Office or Office Building

Historic

Commerce / Commercial Services
Warehouse
Residence
Multiple Dwelling

Architect / Designer

David Hardie

Builder

n/a

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation

Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch, Old St. Stephen's College, 8820 - 112 Street, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P8 (File: Des. 2106)

Cross-Reference to Collection

Fed/Prov/Terr Identifier

4665-0848

Status

Published

Related Places

n/a

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