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Fort Qu'Appelle - Touchwood Hills Trail Provincial Historic Site

Lipton RM 217, Saskatchewan, S0G, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1986/08/21

Looking southeast at Historic Site and cart tracks, 2004.; Government of Saskatchewan, Marvin Thomas, 2004.
Fort Qu'Appelle -Touchwood Hills Trail
Close-up view looking southeast at Historic Site and cart tracks, 2004.; Government of Saskatchewan, Marvin Thomas, 2004.
Fort Qu'Appelle -Touchwood Hills Trail (Close-up)
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Other Name(s)

n/a

Links and documents

Construction Date(s)

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2005/04/15

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

The Fort Qu'Appelle - Touchwood Hills Trail Provincial Historic Site comprises a .13 hectare parcel of land adjacent to Highway 35 north of the Qu'Appelle Valley and the Town of Fort Qu'Appelle. The site features a short segment of remnant cart track preserved in a small patch of native prairie.

Heritage Value

The heritage value of the Fort Qu'Appelle - Touchwood Hills Trail Provincial Historic Site lies in its association with the early transportation and communication networks of the Canadian West. Initially, Europeans explored the continent's interior via its waterways. As trading posts and settlements multiplied, overland transportation became increasingly important. Although heavily travelled, the early trails were usually little more than rough tracks rutted by the traffic of horse- and ox-drawn wagons and carts.

The route of the Fort Qu’Appelle-Touchwood Hills Trail was likely first used by First Nations and Métis people travelling between the Fishing Lakes and the Touchwood Hills. During the last half of the nineteenth century, the trail carried traffic between Hudson’s Bay Company posts in the Touchwood Hills and the Company's Fort Qu'Appelle post . In 1882, a segment of the Dominion Telegraph was constructed alongside the trail. For a time, the trail was an important overland link between the Canadian Pacific Railway station at Qu’Appelle and the Carlton Trail at Touchwood. Notable travellers on the trail during this period were General Frederick Middleton and his column of militia on their march to Batoche during the North-West Resistance of 1885.

The importance of western Canada's trail system diminished with the coming of railways and, eventually, automobiles and roads. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the once vital trails had largely fallen into disuse or were used only for local travel. Most disappeared under the plough, with only scattered remnants such as the Fort Qu'Appelle - Touchwood Hills Trail Provincial Historic Site existing today as reminders of a bygone era of transportation.

Source:

Province of Saskatchewan, Order in Council 870/86, August 21, 1986.

Character-Defining Elements

The heritage value of the Fort Qu'Appelle - Touchwood Hills Trail Provincial Historic Site resides in the following character-defining elements:
-those elements that identify the site as a segment of a former cart and wagon trail, including the remnant wheel ruts and small tract of undisturbed native prairie;
-the site’s location on the historic travel route between Fort Qu’Appelle and the Touchwood Hills.

Recognition

Jurisdiction

Saskatchewan

Recognition Authority

Government of Saskatchewan

Recognition Statute

Parks Act, s. 7

Recognition Type

Historic Site

Recognition Date

1986/08/21

Historical Information

Significant Date(s)

n/a

Theme - Category and Type

Developing Economies
Communications and Transportation

Function - Category and Type

Current

Leisure
Park

Historic

Transport-Land
Road or Public Way

Architect / Designer

n/a

Builder

n/a

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation

Department of Culture Youth and Recreation Heritage Resources Branch 1919 Saskatchewan Drive Regina, SK File: GR 2247

Cross-Reference to Collection

Fed/Prov/Terr Identifier

GR 2247

Status

Published

Related Places

n/a

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