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Cabot Tower

Signal Hill Road, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1988/12/01

General view of Cabot Tower, showing its two-storey 9.4-metre (30-foot) square structure and three-storey 15.24-metre (50-foot) octagonal tower, 1988.; Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, I. Doull , 1988.
Side view
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Other Name(s)

n/a

Links and documents

Construction Date(s)

1900/01/01

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2005/05/06

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

Located at the highest point of Signal Hill National Historic Site of Canada, overlooking the city and the ocean, the Cabot Tower built of irregularly coursed red sandstone is composed of a two storey, 9.4-metre (30-foot), square structure with a three storey, 15.24-metre (50-foot) octagonal tower that stands on the southeast corner of the building. The corners are buttressed at the first floor level and further emphasized through the use of heavier blocks of stone. On the main body of the building, at the top of the second storey level, is a line of repeating pattern like an exaggerated dentil row or inverted crenulations. The attached tower which houses the main entrance, is very plain with a double stringcourse marking the divisions between second and third storeys and heavy corbel tables marking the eight corners of the turret at the flared upper level. The windows on both the corner turret and the body of the tower proper are rectangular and set under heavy stone lintels. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building.

Heritage Value

The Cabot Tower is a Classified Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental values.

Historical Value
The Cabot Tower is one of the best examples illustrating the evolution of communications in Canada from the earliest aural and visual systems, through to the long-distance, wireless transmission of the human voice. The tower housed signalling functions until 1958, and is associated with Guglielmo Marconi who received the Nobel Prize in 1909 for physics and communication and who received the first trans-Atlantic transmission of the human voice at Signal Hill in 1920. It was built as a monument to John Cabot’s 1497 voyage to North America and to the 60th anniversary of Queen Victoria’s reign.

Architectural Value
Cabot Tower is a very good example of the late-Gothic revival style. Its highly integrated design, its form, secondary elements, materials and the manner in which they are worked and assembled contribute to its solid enduring appearance. Reinforced by the use of large blocks of stone, irregularly coursed sandstone, buttresses at the corners, crenulations and other Scottish-Baronial details, its solid and monumental appearance characterize the structure. Its architect, William Howe Greene was a prominent St. John’s architect and an associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects. Having completed many commissions in St. John’s, Cabot Tower had a very high profile and is a very good example of his work.

Environmental Value
Cabot Tower, situated at the highest point at Signal Hill National Historic Site of Canada establishes the present character of the area within its dramatic natural setting. More than a local landmark, many Canadians perceive it as a symbol of Newfoundland. The tower’s physical prominence, overlooking the city and ocean makes it visually conspicuous and easily identifiable. The symbol of the tower has become public domain used locally in commercials, calendars, post cards, pins, books and tourism materials.

Sources:
Kate MacFarlane, Cabot Tower, Signal Hill National Historic Site, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office Building Report 88-043; Cabot Tower, Signal Hill National Historic Site, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Heritage Character Statement 88-043.

Character-Defining Elements

The character defining elements of the Cabot Tower should be respected.

Its very good example of late-Gothic revival style with its highly integrated design, form, fine materials and craftsmanship as manifested in:
-its two-storey 9.4-metre (30-foot) square structure and three-storey 15.24-metre (50-foot) octagonal tower;
-the entirety of the exterior elevations with its solid and monumental appearance reinforced by the use of large blocks of stone, irregularly coursed sandstone, buttresses at the corners, crenellations and Scottish-Baronial details;
-the attached tower housing the main entrance with a double stringcourse marking the divisions between second and third storeys and heavy stone corbel tables marking the eight corners of the turret at the flared upper level;
-the rectangular window openings set under heavy stone lintels on both the corner turret and the body of the tower;
-its interior layout and fabric that relate to its function as a signal and communications tower.

The manner in which Cabot Tower establishes the present character of Signal Hill National Historic Site of Canada within its dramatic natural setting and is perceived as the symbol of Newfoundland.

Recognition

Jurisdiction

Federal

Recognition Authority

Government of Canada

Recognition Statute

Treasury Board Heritage Buildings Policy

Recognition Type

Classified Federal Heritage Building

Recognition Date

1988/12/01

Historical Information

Significant Date(s)

n/a

Theme - Category and Type

Function - Category and Type

Current

Historic

Health and Research
Research Facility
Community
Commemorative Monument

Architect / Designer

William Howe Greene

Builder

n/a

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation

National Historic Sites Directorate, Documentation Centre, 5th Floor, Room 89, 25 Eddy Street, Gatineau, Quebec

Cross-Reference to Collection

Fed/Prov/Terr Identifier

3263

Status

Published

Related Places

n/a

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