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Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection National Historic Site of Canada

1106 First Street SW, Dauphin, Manitoba, R7N, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1996/11/19

General view of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection, showing the tight massing of its towers, many roof levels and four secondary domes around a large central dome, 1996.; Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1996.
General view
View of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection, showing the classically inspired exterior detailing including a symmetrically arranged façade with columned entry porch, 2001.; Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2001.
Façade
No Image

Other Name(s)

n/a

Links and documents

Construction Date(s)

1936/01/01 to 1939/01/01

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2009/05/12

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

The Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection National Historic Site of Canada is a large multi-domed concrete church located in the town of Dauphin, Manitoba. Both its exuberant exterior and its strikingly decorated interior are a memorable expression of the pride and cultural values of the Ukrainian-Canadian community who built it in the middle of the 20th century.

Heritage Value

The Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1996 because:
- it is an example of the mature and culminating expression of Ukrainian identity of the Dauphin Block Settlement of Ukrainians, a lasting and sophisticated symbol of their roots; and
- its evocative, multi-domed architecture and its stunning interior are based on models in Kiev, Ukraine, and on centuries of Byzantine-derived iconography, both adapted for a New World context.

The heritage value of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Resurrection National Historic Site of Canada lies in its expression of Ukrainian-Canadian identity as illustrated by the forms, design and decoration of the church derived from its congregation’s adherence to Byzantine Catholic iconographic traditions. The church was built from1936 to1939 by the community of Dauphin Block Ukrainians who had begun to settle in the area in 1896. It followed plans prepared by Reverend Philip Ruh, the priest of the Ukrainian congregation at nearby Cook’s Creek. In attempting to be economical in the costs of its construction, Ruh experimented with concrete in order to achieve interesting textures and decorative effects as well as the strength and durability required by the Canadian climate. In 1957-1958, the interior of the church was decorated by Theodore Baran, a Ukrainian ecclesiastical artist who had immigrated to Canada.

Source: Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, Minutes, 1996.

Character-Defining Elements

Key elements that contribute to the heritage value of this site include:
- its urban setting and landscaped site;
- its cruciform footprint and multi-domed profile based on the Kiev-model;
- the tight massing of its towers, many roof levels and four secondary domes around a large central dome;
- the classically inspired exterior detailing including round-headed windows, high drum domes, arcading, a symmetrically arranged façade with columned entry porch;
- its contemporary construction materials such as interlocking concrete block, rough concrete stucco, cast concrete columns;
- its interlocking concrete block solid wall construction technology;
- the high quality of craftsmanship of its construction and finish;
- the adaptation of traditional Eastern European Christian iconography on the extensively decorated interior as designed and executed by Theodore Baran (particularly the iconostasis, and decoration of the dome and nave) in their materials, design and extent;
- the continued use of the building by the community.

Recognition

Jurisdiction

Federal

Recognition Authority

Government of Canada

Recognition Statute

Historic Sites and Monuments Act

Recognition Type

National Historic Site of Canada

Recognition Date

1996/11/19

Historical Information

Significant Date(s)

1957/01/01 to 1958/01/01

Theme - Category and Type

Function - Category and Type

Current

Historic

Religion, Ritual and Funeral
Religious Facility or Place of Worship

Architect / Designer

Theodore Baran

Builder

n/a

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation

National Historic Sites Directorate, Documentation Centre, 5th Floor, Room 89, 25 Eddy Street, Gatineau, Quebec

Cross-Reference to Collection

Fed/Prov/Terr Identifier

1796

Status

Published

Related Places

n/a

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