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McNAUGHT HOMESTEAD

near Beaverlodge, Alberta, T0H, Canada

Formally Recognized: 2003/10/18

McNaught Homestead Provincial Historic Resource; Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch
Log house (now stuccoed)
McNaught Homestead Provincial Historic Resource; Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch
Large barn
McNaught Homestead Provincial Historic Resource; Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch
Schoolhouse

Other Name(s)

n/a

Links and documents

Construction Date(s)

1911/01/01

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2008/03/14

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

The McNaught Homestead cultural landscape consists of seventeen buildings situated on approximately 64.15 hectares of land. The site includes residences, barns, granaries, sheds, a garage, a pump house, a chicken coop, and a school house. The original log house on the property has been covered in stucco. The McNaught homestead is located immediately west of Highway 722, just south of Beaverlodge.

Heritage Value

The heritage value of the McNaught Homestead lies in its representation of early settlement buildings in the Peace River Country, its landmark value in the region, and its association with artist Euphemia McNaught.

In 1909, members of a group of excommunicated Methodists known as the Christian Association emigrated from Ontario to the Beaverlodge area of Northern Alberta. Two years later, more settlers from central Canada, some of whom were affiliated with the Christian Association, joined them. Both groups were part of the first wave of homesteaders that set down roots in Northern Alberta from 1910 to 1914. Charles and Eliza McNaught first came to the district with the second group of settlers in 1911, though they were not affiliated with the Christian Association. During their early years on the farm, the McNaughts' farmstead included six buildings still standing on the current site: a two-storey log house, a pump house, two barns, a chicken coop, and a schoolhouse. Additional structures were added in subsequent years. One of the most complete collections of buildings dating from the first settlement wave in the Peace River Country, the McNaught Homestead has become a significant landmark in the district for its integrity and historical value.

The McNaught Homestead also possesses unique heritage value for its association with Charles and Eliza's daughter, Euphemia McNaught. Born in Ontario, Euphemia came with her family to the Beaverlodge area in 1912. A gifted artist, she graduated from the Ontario College of Art in 1929. Two of her instructors at the college were Group of Seven members' J.E.H. MacDonald and Arthur Lismer. Euphemia eventually returned to the family farmstead and set up a studio in the former Appleton schoolhouse on the property. She gained provincial and national acclaim for her depictions of the Northwest Canadian landscape.

Source: Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch (File: Des. 1880)

Character-Defining Elements

The heritage value of the McNaught Homestead cultural landscape includes such character-defining elements as:

The McNaught's original log house:
- two-storey round log construction with dovetail corners;
- central log beam supporting floor joists and wood decking of second floor;
- fenestration pattern and original window casings and sills;
- gable roof with exposed rack overhang.

The frame pump house:
- wood framing, with simple gable roof and loft space.

Large barn:
- log construction of walls, beams, and posts with stick framing for the large gable walls above the loft floor level;
- large, pointed, Gothic arch roof with louvered cupola and bellcast eaves;
- main floor plan with centre aisle access to stalls on either side;
- large barn doors, stall fences and gates;
- pulley and rail system.

Small barn:
- log construction of main floor walls, stick framing of loft level walls;
- simple gable roof with minimal eave and rake overhangs;
- hinged access doors in the east elevation and the north gable.

Log chicken coop
- log construction with low, asymmetrical gable roof;
- fenestration pattern and access door in east gable end wall;
- interior subdivisions.

Log schoolhouse
- hewn log construction with dovetail corners;
- brick masonry fireplace, hearth and chimney;
- main access door in east gable wall and back door in west wall;
- fenestration pattern, including bank of south-facing windows;
- no interior partitions.

Recognition

Jurisdiction

Alberta

Recognition Authority

Province of Alberta

Recognition Statute

Historical Resources Act

Recognition Type

Provincial Historic Resource

Recognition Date

2003/10/18

Historical Information

Significant Date(s)

n/a

Theme - Category and Type

Peopling the Land
Settlement
Developing Economies
Extraction and Production
Expressing Intellectual and Cultural Life
Learning and the Arts

Function - Category and Type

Current

Leisure
Historic or Interpretive Site

Historic

Food Supply
Farm or Ranch

Architect / Designer

n/a

Builder

n/a

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation

Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch, Old St. Stephen's College, 8820 - 112 Street, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P8 (File: Des. 1880)

Cross-Reference to Collection

Fed/Prov/Terr Identifier

4665-0873

Status

Published

Related Places

n/a

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